Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effect of Different Educational Interventions on Knowledge of HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer among Young Female Adults: A Preliminary Report

Version 1 : Received: 21 March 2022 / Approved: 22 March 2022 / Online: 22 March 2022 (13:58:09 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Takahashi, Y.; Nishida, H.; Ichinose, T.; Miyagawa, Y.; Kido, K.; Hiraike, H.; Ishikawa, H.; Nagasaka, K. Effect of Different Educational Interventions on Knowledge of HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer among Young Women: A Preliminary Report. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5191. Takahashi, Y.; Nishida, H.; Ichinose, T.; Miyagawa, Y.; Kido, K.; Hiraike, H.; Ishikawa, H.; Nagasaka, K. Effect of Different Educational Interventions on Knowledge of HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer among Young Women: A Preliminary Report. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5191.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5191
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19095191

Abstract

The incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer are rising among young women in Japan. In November 2021, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare reinstated the active recommendation for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which was discontinued in June 2013 due to reports of adverse reactions, including chronic pain and motor dysfunction, following vaccination. However, vaccine hesitancy among the younger generation remains, and it is essential to identify the barriers in vaccination uptake. Therefore, we aim to conduct a randomized study using different methods of providing educational contents to improve health literacy regarding cervical cancer and HPV vaccination among female students in Japan. Here, we present the results of our preliminary report and discuss current topics related to HPV vaccination in Japan. Data were collected from 27 female students—divided into three groups: no intervention, print-based intervention, and SNS-based intervention—using the Health Literacy Scale and Communicative and Critical Health Literacy scale. Our primary results indicate that participants’ knowledge and health literacy improved post intervention. Therefore, medical professionals must provide accurate scientific knowledge regarding routine HPV vaccination and the risk of cervical cancer to young women to improve their health literacy and subsequently increase the HPV vaccination rates.

Keywords

HPV vaccination; vaccine hesitancy; barriers; health literacy; cervical cancer

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Obstetrics & Gynaecology

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