Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Pathways to Participation (P2P) Program: A Pilot Outcomes Study

Version 1 : Received: 19 March 2022 / Approved: 21 March 2022 / Online: 21 March 2022 (08:56:09 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Hitch, D.; Vernon, L.; Collins, R.; Dun, C.; Palexas, S.; Lhuede, K. The Pathways to Participation (P2P) Program: A Pilot Outcomes Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6088. Hitch, D.; Vernon, L.; Collins, R.; Dun, C.; Palexas, S.; Lhuede, K. The Pathways to Participation (P2P) Program: A Pilot Outcomes Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6088.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6088
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19106088

Abstract

Research has consistently found that people with mental illness (known as consumers) experience lower levels of participation in meaningful activities, which can limit their opportunities for recovery support. The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes of participation in a group program designed to address all stages of activity participation, known as Pathways to Participation (P2P). A descriptive longitudinal design was utilized, collecting data at three time points. Outcomes were measured by the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal (CANSAS), Recovery Assessment Scale – Domains and Stages (RAS-DS), Behaviour and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24), Living in the Community Questionnaire (LCQ) and time use diaries. All data was analysed using descriptive statistics, and Chi square analyses. Seventeen consumers completed baseline data, eleven contributed post program data and eight provided follow up data. Most were female (63.64%) and had been living with mental illness for 11.50 (± 7.74) years on average. Reductions in unmet needs and improvements in self-rated recovery scores were re-ported, but no changes were identified in either time use or psychosocial health. The findings indicate the P2P program may enable consumers to achieve positive activity and participation out-comes as part of their personal recovery.

Keywords

recovery; mental illness; mental health; psychiatry; social inclusion; occupational therapy; occupations; time use; activities of daily living; work.

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Psychiatry & Mental Health studies

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