Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Helicobacter Pylori in Native Americans in Northern Arizona

Version 1 : Received: 27 February 2022 / Approved: 1 March 2022 / Online: 1 March 2022 (06:52:14 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Monroy, F.P.; Brown, H.E.; Sanderson, P.R.; Jarrin, G.; Mbegbu, M.; Kyman, S.; Harris, R.B. Helicobacter pylori in Native Americans in Northern Arizona. Diseases 2022, 10, 19. Monroy, F.P.; Brown, H.E.; Sanderson, P.R.; Jarrin, G.; Mbegbu, M.; Kyman, S.; Harris, R.B. Helicobacter pylori in Native Americans in Northern Arizona. Diseases 2022, 10, 19.

Journal reference: Diseases 2022, 10, 19
DOI: 10.3390/diseases10020019

Abstract

Background: In Arizona Helicobacter pylori prevalence of infection among Navajo adults is about 62% and gastric cancer incidence rate is 3-4 times higher than that of the non-Hispanic White population. Aim: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of specific H. pylori virulence factors (cagA and vacA) among Navajo patients undergoing and their association with gastric disease. Methods: Virulence genes, cagA and vacA, in H. pylori were investigated in gastric biopsies from 96 Navajo patients over age 18 who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Biopsies from the antrum and fundus were used for molecular characterization to determine cagA type and number of EPIYA motifs and presence of alleles in the signal (s) and medium (m) regions of the vacA gene. Results: H. pylori infection was found in 22.9% of the biopsy samples. The cagA gene amplified in 57.6% of samples and showed a predominant “Western cagA” type, with the EPIYA-ABC motif (45.4%), most prevalent. The vacA allele s1bm1 was the most prevalent (54.5%). Conclusions: H. pylori genotypes were predominantly cagA Western-type and ABC EPIYA motifs. The vacA s1bm1 genotype was the most prevalent and seemed to be associated with gastritis. American Indian/Alaska Native populations are at higher risk for gastric cancer. It is important to identify genotypes of H. pylori and virulence factors involved in the high prevalence of H. pylori and associated disease among the Navajo population.

Keywords

Helicobacter pylori; gastric cancer; Navajos; Native Americans; American Indians; virulence factors

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Microbiology

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