Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Lactic Acidosis Associated with Metformin in Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Narrative Review

Version 1 : Received: 24 February 2022 / Approved: 28 February 2022 / Online: 28 February 2022 (09:28:33 CET)

How to cite: Rahman, F.; Tuba, S. Lactic Acidosis Associated with Metformin in Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Narrative Review. Preprints 2022, 2022020353 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202202.0353.v1). Rahman, F.; Tuba, S. Lactic Acidosis Associated with Metformin in Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Narrative Review. Preprints 2022, 2022020353 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202202.0353.v1).

Abstract

Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolite disorder with parameters of high blood sugar levels. In the management of diabetes can be used the drug metformin is the gold of choice to achieve a therapeutic effect and rarely causes side effects of the drug, but it still has debate view. However, if used in excessive doses for patients with kidney disease, it will be contraindicated with side effects such as lactic acidosis. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the side effect of Metformin for diabetic kidney diseases (DKD) patients. Method: This study used the Narrative Review Method that was obtained from 2011 to 2021, in the English language from PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library. Results: Metformin is at the forefront of the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Metformin is likely to have lactic acidosis-related adverse effects in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, such as increased arterial lactate. Lactic acidosis is defined as an increase in arterial lactate with an indicator of more than five mmol/L and an arterial blood pH of less than 7.35. Metformin-induced lactate levels are considered to be below the parameters. DKD risk factors can be conceptually classified as several susceptibility factors, initiation factors, and developmental factors. The two most prominent risk factors are hyperglycemia and hypertension. Conclusion: Metformin can increase lactate levels in CKD patients but is still below the parameters of lactic acidosis. This study may have some weaknesses and requires further prospective research to validate the results.

Keywords

Diabetic; Chronic Kidney Disease; Metformin; Acidosis Lactate

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Endocrinology & Metabolomics

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