Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization Among Australian Indigenous Children

Version 1 : Received: 22 February 2022 / Approved: 23 February 2022 / Online: 23 February 2022 (05:26:35 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Islam, M.I.; Chadwick, V.; Esgin, T.; Martiniuk, A. Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization among Australian Indigenous Children. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4995. Islam, M.I.; Chadwick, V.; Esgin, T.; Martiniuk, A. Bullied Because of Their Teeth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study on the Impact of Oral Health on Bullying Victimization among Australian Indigenous Children. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4995.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 4995
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19094995

Abstract

Making life better for Indigenous peoples is a global priority. Although bullying and oral health have always been a topic of concern, there is limited information regarding the impact of this problem in the general population, with no evidence in this regard among the Australian Indigenous population. Thus, we aimed to quantify the relationship between bullying victimization and oral health problems by remoteness among 766 Australian Indigenous children aged between 10–15-year-olds using data from the LSIC study. Bivariate and multilevel mixed-effect logistic regression analyses were employed. Findings indicated children self-reported bullying more than parents reported their children were being bullied (44% vs 33.6%), with a higher percentage from rural/remote areas than urban areas. Parents reported oral health problem increases the probability (OR 2.20, p<0.05) of being bullied in Indigenous children living in urban areas. Racial discrimination, lower level of parental education and poor child oral hygiene increase the risk of bullying victimization. Parental happiness with life and a safe community was associated with a lower risk of bullying. Dental problems are linked with Australian Indigenous children experiencing bullying victimization. Cultural resilience and eliminating discrimination maybe two modifiable paths to ameliorating health issues associated with bullying in the Australian Indigenous community.

Keywords

Bullying; Oral health; Indigenous; Children; Australia

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Psychiatry & Mental Health studies

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