Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Mechanism for Hydrogen Embrittlement in Martensitic Steel Based on Hydrogen Dilation

Version 1 : Received: 19 February 2022 / Approved: 22 February 2022 / Online: 22 February 2022 (11:37:29 CET)

How to cite: McGuire, M.F.; Matway, R.J. A Mechanism for Hydrogen Embrittlement in Martensitic Steel Based on Hydrogen Dilation. Preprints 2022, 2022020275. https://doi.org/10.20944/preprints202202.0275.v1. McGuire, M.F.; Matway, R.J. A Mechanism for Hydrogen Embrittlement in Martensitic Steel Based on Hydrogen Dilation. Preprints 2022, 2022020275. https://doi.org/10.20944/preprints202202.0275.v1.

Abstract

Martensitic steels are used at a wide range of strength levels in environments which expose them to hydrogen or water vapor over a large range of partial pressures and temperatures. Hydrogen can cause catastrophic failures under many seemingly benign conditions. The effect of hydrogen on the dimension stability of high strength martensitic steels under such conditions has been poorly understood, and existing models do not seem to adequately account for it. Experiments were conducted to measure the variation in volume due to the uptake of hydrogen of such steels under near-ambient conditions, and the results were compared to theoretical estimates derived from the density of defects acting as hydrogen traps. Based on these results a new model for hydrogen embrittlement was developed. The hydrogen lattice dilation (HLD) model isolates volume expansion as a primary driver of hydrogen embrittlement. It provides and distinguishes two modes of failure acceleration: the fast, brittle, stress-intensity independent cracking under higher static crack loading, and a slower, highly stress-intensity dependent tearing mode at lower stress intensity. The relationship between the two is explained, as is how hydrogen absorption by defects accounts for the crack threshold and crack velocity of each.

Keywords

hydrogen embrittlement; martensite; dislocation density; fracture mechanics; stainless steel

Subject

MATERIALS SCIENCE, Metallurgy

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