Preprint Article Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Vulnerability Assessment of Pacific Whiteleg Shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) Farms and Vendors in Davao, Philippines Using FishVool

Version 1 : Received: 14 February 2022 / Approved: 17 February 2022 / Online: 17 February 2022 (10:50:59 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 16 March 2022 / Approved: 17 March 2022 / Online: 17 March 2022 (10:58:39 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Macusi, E.D.; Albarido, N.A.; Clapano, M.B.; Santos, M.D. Vulnerability Assessment of Pacific Whiteleg Shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) Farms and Vendors in Davao, Philippines Using FishVool. Sustainability 2022, 14, 4541. Macusi, E.D.; Albarido, N.A.; Clapano, M.B.; Santos, M.D. Vulnerability Assessment of Pacific Whiteleg Shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) Farms and Vendors in Davao, Philippines Using FishVool. Sustainability 2022, 14, 4541.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2022, 14, 4541
DOI: 10.3390/su14084541

Abstract

The impacts of climate change on shrimp aquaculture can vary widely and can have environmental and socioeconomic consequences. This study assessed the vulnerability to climate change impacts of selected small-scale shrimp farms of Penaeus vannamei and shrimpfish market vendors in Davao region, Philippines using a modified Fisheries Vulnerability Assessment Tool (FishVool). Shrimp farmers and vendors were interviewed using two separate semi-structured questionnaires. A total of thirty-nine (N=39) shrimp farmers and forty-eight (N=48) market vendors from various market areas within the region were interviewed. Data regarding exposure (E), sensitivity (S), and adaptive capacity (AC) were collected following the FishVool parameters with modifications. Results revealed that overall climate change vulnerability of the shrimp farmers was medium (M), where both exposure and adaptive capacity were low (L) while sensitivity was medium (M). In addition, the shrimp market vulnerability of the various sites examined revealed medium (M) scores for markets in Pantukan, Mabini, Tagum, Maco, Lupon, Davao City, and Digos. But high (H) vulnerability scores for the markets in Panabo and Sta Cruz. Overall, the study provided a better understanding about shrimp farming in relation to climate change impacts and vulnerability and provided information for future shrimp farm management, marketing and climate change adapation in the region.

Keywords

Aquaculture; Climate change; Davao Oriental; FishVool; Management; Mati City; Shrimp culture

Subject

EARTH SCIENCES, Environmental Sciences

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 17 March 2022
Commenter: Edison Roi Macusi
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: The details of changes include the method section which was edited extensively and given highlights in yellow for all the changes or revisions in the manuscript. Other changes included extensive editing for the discussion part and the conclusion and recommendation which was shortened and tightened.
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