Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Alterations in Food Reward Regarding Bariatric Surgery Type and Weight Loss Outcomes: An Exploratory Study

Version 1 : Received: 4 January 2022 / Approved: 6 January 2022 / Online: 6 January 2022 (09:49:34 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Guyot, E.; Nazare, J.-A.; Oustric, P.; Robert, M.; Disse, E.; Dougkas, A.; Iceta, S. Food Reward after Bariatric Surgery and Weight Loss Outcomes: An Exploratory Study. Nutrients 2022, 14, 449. Guyot, E.; Nazare, J.-A.; Oustric, P.; Robert, M.; Disse, E.; Dougkas, A.; Iceta, S. Food Reward after Bariatric Surgery and Weight Loss Outcomes: An Exploratory Study. Nutrients 2022, 14, 449.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2022, 14, 449
DOI: 10.3390/nu14030449

Abstract

Changes in food preferences after bariatric surgery may alter its effectiveness as a treatment for obesity. We aimed to compare food reward for a comprehensive variety of food categories between patients who received a sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and to explore whether food reward differs according to weight loss. In this cross-sectional exploratory study, food reward was assessed using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire (LFPQ). We assessed liking and wanting of eleven food categories. Comparisons were done regarding type of surgery and Total Weight Loss (TWL; based on tercile distribution). Fifty-six patients (30 SG and 26 RYGB) were included (women: 70%; age: 44.0 (11.1) y). Regarding the type of surgery, scores were not significantly different between SG and RYGB, except for ‘non-dairy products – without color’ explicit liking (p = 0.04). Regarding TWL outcomes, explicit liking, explicit wanting and implicit wanting, scores were significantly higher for Good responders than Low responders for ‘No meat – High fat’ (post-hoc corrected p-value: 0.04, 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Together, our results failed to identify major differences in liking and wanting regarding the type of surgery and tended to indicate that higher weight loss might be related to a higher reward for high protein-content food. Rather to focus only on palatable foods, future studies should also consider a broader range of food items, including protein reward.

Keywords

Food reward; Liking; Wanting; Food preferences; Bariatric surgery; Eating behavior; Total Weight Loss

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Nutrition

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