Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Relationship between Employees’ Belief in a Just World and Sustainable Organizational Citizenship Behaviors in Chinese Enterprises: The Moderating Effect Model of Interpersonal Intelligence

Version 1 : Received: 26 December 2021 / Approved: 4 January 2022 / Online: 4 January 2022 (12:20:46 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Han, L.; Zhou, H.; Wang, C. Employees’ Belief in a Just World and Sustainable Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Moderating Effect of Interpersonal Intelligence. Sustainability 2022, 14, 2943. Han, L.; Zhou, H.; Wang, C. Employees’ Belief in a Just World and Sustainable Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Moderating Effect of Interpersonal Intelligence. Sustainability 2022, 14, 2943.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2022, 14, 2943
DOI: 10.3390/su14052943

Abstract

To both survive and develop continuously, enterprises must overcome many kinds of competition and challenges. Cultivating employees' active and sustainable organizational citizenship behavior is important for enterprises to successfully cope with turbulence and uncertain events during their development. In this study, we investigated the development level of and factors influencing employees' organizational citizenship behavior in current organizations. By using the Belief in a Just World Scale, Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, and Interpersonal Intelligence Scale, we investigated 230 employees from 15 different enterprises. The results showed that belief in a just world, interpersonal intelligence, and organizational citizenship behavior were significantly positively correlated. Interpersonal intelligence played a moderating role between belief in a just world and organizational citizenship behavior; the organizational citizenship behavior of individuals with high interpersonal intelligence increased with the strengthening of the belief in a just world, and this increase was larger than that experienced by individuals with low interpersonal intelligence. This meant that under a certain level of belief in a just world, a high level of interpersonal intelligence was more conducive to promoting employees' sustainable organizational citizenship behavior.

Keywords

belief in a just world; organizational citizenship behavior; interpersonal intelligence; moderating effect model

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Applied Psychology

Comments (2)

Comment 1
Received: 5 January 2022
Commenter:
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: This paper examines the relationships between employees’ belief in a just world and organizational citizenship behaviors from an interpersonal intelligence view. The perspective is novel, the method is rigorous and the results make contributions to the relevant areas. The writing is easy to follow, and tables and figures are clear. In addition to these highlights, I put forward the following modification suggestions. (1) In the hypotheses developing part, the authors may state specifically how interpersonal intelligence play moderating roles in both general just world belief-OCB and personal just world belief-OCB relationships. (2) The word “the regulating role” in page 4 is better to be altered as “the moderating role”.
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Comment 2
Received: 10 January 2022
Commenter:
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Most studies on belief in a just world (BJW) concern on issues of victim blaming or pro-social behaviors from a perspective of social psychology. This paper represents an new effort of applying findings of BJW in social life situations to organizational settings. Specifically, a type of pro-organizational behavior, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) was examined, and moderation by interpersonal intelligence was found between BJW (both G-BJW and P-BJW ) and OCB. I would like to suggest authors to include more literatures on the relationship between BJW and pro-organizational behaviors into the paper.
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