Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Perceptions of School Management on the Relationship between School Nutrition and Development of Non-communicable Diseases in a Rural South African District: A Qualitative Study

Version 1 : Received: 30 November 2021 / Approved: 1 December 2021 / Online: 1 December 2021 (13:10:10 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Nomatshila, S.C.; Apalata, T.R.; Mabunda, S.A. Perceptions of School Management on the Relationship between School Nutrition and Development of Non-Communicable Diseases in a Rural South African District: A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 432. Nomatshila, S.C.; Apalata, T.R.; Mabunda, S.A. Perceptions of School Management on the Relationship between School Nutrition and Development of Non-Communicable Diseases in a Rural South African District: A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 432.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 19, 432
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19010432

Abstract

Globally, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) were responsible for 41 million deaths in 2016, with the majority of these occurring in low and middle-income countries. These diseases were on the rise as a result of unhealthy, low-quality, and unbalanced diets, which resulted in overweight and obesity. The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) was created to regulate the foods sold to schoolchildren. To ascertain school management teams' perspectives on the relationship between the NSNP and the development of lifestyle diseases. A phenomenological qualitative study using Focus Group Discussions among 16 purposively selected members of the School Management Teams were conducted in Mt Frere, Eastern Cape in 2016. The narrative data was analyzed using Tesch's eight-phase thematic analysis approach. The data analysis revealed two themes (NSNP and the vendor system) and six sub-themes. The NSNP was viewed as making a significant contribution to children's food security, thereby improving academic output. However, reengineering of the NSNP was need through improved budgeting and inclusion of breakfast in the menu to control NCDs risk factors. The current implementation of the vendor system did not support reduction of NCDs risk factors. Improved implementation of the guide to vendor system is needed.

Keywords

Nutrition program; vendor system; qualitative study; obesity; non-communicable diseases

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Nursing & Health Studies

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