Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as an Effective Treatment for Alcoholic Pancreatitis

Version 1 : Received: 19 November 2021 / Approved: 22 November 2021 / Online: 22 November 2021 (11:41:50 CET)

How to cite: Li, H.; Wen, W.; Luo, J. Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as an Effective Treatment for Alcoholic Pancreatitis. Preprints 2021, 2021110384 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0384.v1). Li, H.; Wen, W.; Luo, J. Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress as an Effective Treatment for Alcoholic Pancreatitis. Preprints 2021, 2021110384 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0384.v1).

Abstract

Pancreatitis and alcoholic pancreatitis are serious health concerns, and there is an urgent need for effective treatment strategies. Alcohol is a known etiological factor for pancreatitis, including acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Excessive alcohol consumption induces many pathological stress responses; of particular note is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress results from the accumulation of unfolded/misfolded protein in the ER and is implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis. Here we summarize the possible mechanisms by which ER stress contributes to alcoholic pancreatitis. We also discuss potential approaches targeting ER stress and UPR for developing novel therapeutic strategies for the disease.

Keywords

Alcohol abuse; cell signaling; FDA-approved drugs; oxidative stress; therapy

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Gastroenterology

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