Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Application of Life-cycle Assessment for the Study of Carbon and Water Footprints of the 16.5 MWe Wind Farm in Villonaco, Loja – Ecuador

Version 1 : Received: 23 October 2021 / Approved: 27 October 2021 / Online: 27 October 2021 (11:00:58 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tama, A. (2021) Application of Life-Cycle Assessment for the Study of Carbon and Water Footprints of the 16.5 MWe Wind Farm in Villonaco, Loja, Ecuador. Smart Grid and Renewable Energy, 12, 203-230. doi: 10.4236/sgre.2021.1212012 Tama, A. (2021) Application of Life-Cycle Assessment for the Study of Carbon and Water Footprints of the 16.5 MWe Wind Farm in Villonaco, Loja, Ecuador. Smart Grid and Renewable Energy, 12, 203-230. doi: 10.4236/sgre.2021.1212012

Journal reference: Smart Grid and Renewable Energy 2021, 12, 12
DOI: 10.4236/sgre.2021.1212012

Abstract

Wind technology is considered to be among the most promising types of renewable energy sources, and due to high oil prices and growing concerns about climate change and energy security, it has been the subject of extensive considerations in recent years, including questions related to the relative sustainability of electricity production when the manufacturing, assembly, transportation and dismantling processes of these facilities are taken into account. The present article evaluates the environmental impacts, carbon emissions and water consumption, derived from the production of electric energy of the Villonaco wind farm, located in Loja-Ecuador, during its entire life cycle, using the Life Cycle Analysis method. Finally, it is concluded that wind energy has greater environmental advantages, since it has lower values of carbon and water footprints than other energy sources. Additionally, with the techniques Cumulative Energy Demand and Energy Return on Investment, sustainability in the production of electricity from wind power in Ecuador is demonstrated; and, that due to issues of vulnerability to climate change, the diversification of its energy mix is essential considering the inclusion of non-conventional renewable sources such as solar or wind, this being the only way to reduce both the carbon footprint and the water supply power.

Keywords

Renewable energy; Life cycle analysis; Wind energy; Life cycle assessment; Wind turbine; Carbon footprint; Water consumption; Greenhouse gases; non-conventional renewable sources; Carbon and water footprints.

Subject

ENGINEERING, Energy & Fuel Technology

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