Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Recent Progress on Methods for Estimating and Updating Large Phylogenies

Version 1 : Received: 12 October 2021 / Approved: 18 October 2021 / Online: 18 October 2021 (15:43:34 CEST)

How to cite: Zaharias, P.; Warnow, T. Recent Progress on Methods for Estimating and Updating Large Phylogenies. Preprints 2021, 2021100258 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0258.v1). Zaharias, P.; Warnow, T. Recent Progress on Methods for Estimating and Updating Large Phylogenies. Preprints 2021, 2021100258 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0258.v1).

Abstract

With the increased availability of sequence data and even of fully sequenced and assembled genomes, phylogeny estimation of very large trees (even of hundreds of thousands of sequences) is now a goal for some biologists. Yet, the construction of these phylogenies is a complex pipeline presenting analytical and computational challenges, especially when the number of sequences is very large. In the last few years, new methods have been developed that aim to enable highly accurate phylogeny estimations on these large datasets, including divide-and-conquer techniques for multiple sequence alignment and/or tree estimation, methods that can estimate species trees from multi-locus datasets while addressing heterogeneity due to biological processes (e.g., incomplete lineage sorting and gene duplication and loss), and methods to add sequences into large gene trees or species trees. Here we present some of these recent advances and discuss opportunities for future improvements.

Keywords

phylogeny estimation; multiple sequence alignment; phylogenetic placement; phylogenomics; taxon identification; maximum likelihood

Subject

BIOLOGY, Other

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