Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Adaptive strategies of Rice Leaf Roller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in Response to Different Rearing Temperatures

Version 1 : Received: 5 October 2021 / Approved: 7 October 2021 / Online: 7 October 2021 (15:20:38 CEST)

How to cite: Lv, W.; Jiang, X.; Chen, X.; Cheng, Y.; Xia, J.; Zhang, L. Adaptive strategies of Rice Leaf Roller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in Response to Different Rearing Temperatures. Preprints 2021, 2021100123 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0123.v1). Lv, W.; Jiang, X.; Chen, X.; Cheng, Y.; Xia, J.; Zhang, L. Adaptive strategies of Rice Leaf Roller, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in Response to Different Rearing Temperatures. Preprints 2021, 2021100123 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0123.v1).

Abstract

Understanding how species that follow different life-history strategies respond to stressful temperature can be essential to efficient treatments against agricultural pests. Here we focus on how the development and reproduction of C. medinalis is influenced by exposure to different rearing temperatures in the immature stage. We found that low (18 or 22 °C) or high (30 and 34 °C) rearing temperatures negatively affected the immature development and flight performance compared to the normal temperature 26 °C, with higher larval and pupal mortality, lower pupation and eclosion rates and shorter flight duration and distance. Low rearing temperatures significantly slowed down the immature process, but accelerated adult reproduction. However, high rearing temperatures had the opposite impacts. Interestingly, the flight of adults with un-mature rearing low temperatures (18 and 22 °C) significantly decreased their lifetime fecundity and mating frequency, but increased pre-oviposition period of females compared to the control; On contrast, high rearing temperatures (30 and 34 °C) significantly accelerated onset of oviposition and enhanced synchrony of spawning. These results indicate high rearing temperatures in the immature stage are more likely to trigger the onset of migration, but low rearing temperatures induces adults to have a greater resident propensity with stronger reproductive ability.

Keywords

Cnaphalocrocis medinalis; rearing temperatures; development; reproduction; flight performance

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