Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Violation of the Relativistic Energy Conservation Law and Einstein’s Principle of Relativity Caused by the Generation of Mechanical Transverse Waves in a Moving Medium

Version 1 : Received: 16 September 2021 / Approved: 16 September 2021 / Online: 16 September 2021 (14:20:57 CEST)

How to cite: Kawashima, K. Violation of the Relativistic Energy Conservation Law and Einstein’s Principle of Relativity Caused by the Generation of Mechanical Transverse Waves in a Moving Medium. Preprints 2021, 2021090291 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0291.v1). Kawashima, K. Violation of the Relativistic Energy Conservation Law and Einstein’s Principle of Relativity Caused by the Generation of Mechanical Transverse Waves in a Moving Medium. Preprints 2021, 2021090291 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0291.v1).

Abstract

We study the effect of the generation of the mechanical transverse wave (MTW) travelling in the opposite direction (OD) to a moving medium (MM) on the relativistic energy conservation law (RECL). From the viewpoint of the relativity of simultaneity (RS), the time on the coordinate coinciding with the advance end of the wave (AEW) travelling toward the rear of the MM passes faster than that on the coordinate coinciding with the wave source (WS). Then the AEW in the MM travels forward compared to that in the rest frame of reference (RFR) which is stationary relative to the medium when the time on the coordinate coinciding with the WS is same for each inertial frame of reference (IFR). Hence, the coordinate interval (CI) between the AEW and WS in the MM is observed to be larger than that between them in the RFR. We show that this difference holds true for the CI of any portion having transverse velocities mutually converted by the Lorentz transformation (LT). This difference in the CI leads to that in the rest mass (RM). We demonstrate that the RM included in wave motion (WM) in the MM is larger than one included in WM in the RFR when comparing the portions having transverse velocities mutually converted by the LT. This relation holds true for all portions in WM. Therefore, the total coordinate interval of the portion (CIP) and total RM (TRM) included in WM in the MM (WMMM) are large compared to them included in WM in the RFR. Furthermore, we compare the relativistic kinetic energy (RKE) of the MTW travelling in the OD to the MM (ODMM) with that of the MTW propagating in the direction vertical to the moving direction of the medium. We prove that the CIP and RM included in the former MTW are larger than them included in the latter MTW when comparing each portion with the same transverse velocity (TV). Moreover, the total CIP and TRM included in the former MTW are also large compared to them included in the latter MTW. The reason for these is that the latter CIP and RM are equal to them in the RFR when comparing the portions having transverse velocities mutually converted by the LT. On the other hand, the energy supplied to generate each MTW is the same. From these, we demonstrate that the RKE of the MTW travelling in the ODMM can be larger than the total relativistic energy (TRE) of the MTW propagating in the direction vertical to the moving direction of the medium. Consequently, we propose a violation of the RECL and Einstein’s principle of relativity (EPR) because the TRE is not necessarily conserved in the IFR in which the medium is moving.

Keywords

relativistic energy; energy conservation law; Einstein’s principle of relativity; rest mass in wave motion; relativity of simultaneity; time dilation; Lorentz contraction; mechanical transverse wave; special relativity

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