Preprint Review Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Review of Misinformation Across Disciplines: Implication for Online Education

Version 1 : Received: 25 August 2021 / Approved: 26 August 2021 / Online: 26 August 2021 (13:44:19 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 27 August 2021 / Approved: 30 August 2021 / Online: 30 August 2021 (10:26:50 CEST)

How to cite: Huang, T. A Review of Misinformation Across Disciplines: Implication for Online Education. Preprints 2021, 2021080511 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0511.v2). Huang, T. A Review of Misinformation Across Disciplines: Implication for Online Education. Preprints 2021, 2021080511 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0511.v2).

Abstract

Misinformation research has grown to become a critical topic in all disciplines. Since the expanding of online media, misinformation has been spreading rapidly across the globe through social media and other information systems. Paralleling the rise of academic interest in misinformation, is the emergence of online education scholarship. Interest in the online educational implications of misinformation and its impact attracts an increase in scholarship on misinformation. This article presents the results of a review of 1172 publications with “Misinformation” across disciplines and a subset of 174 misinformation literature in online education that were published between 2009 and 2021. This review answers three questions: (1) What is the overall distribution of publication activity with "misinformation" publications? (2) What methodologies have scholars used to investigate misinformation involving online education? (3) What have scholars reported about the results of studies involving misinformation in online education? The review reveals that various methodologies were used in literature focusing on misinformation online education with leading numbers of content analysis and quantitative studies. This systematic review is particularly relevant to those online educators in various disciplines who are interested in learning what scholars from their own academic disciplines are writing about misinformation.

Keywords

review; misinformation; online education; research; discipline

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 30 August 2021
Commenter: Ting Huang
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: I changed some insistency in the manuscript (Due to my formatting of APA to MDPI formatting). I also deleted some overlapping languages and also reorganized some paragraphs. I attached a supplementary file with changes being highlighted.
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