Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Version 1 : Received: 24 August 2021 / Approved: 26 August 2021 / Online: 26 August 2021 (11:54:33 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kołodziejczyk-Nowotarska, A.; Bokiniec, R.; Seliga-Siwecka, J. Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3442. Kołodziejczyk-Nowotarska, A.; Bokiniec, R.; Seliga-Siwecka, J. Monitored Supplementation of Vitamin D in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3442.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2021, 13, 3442
DOI: 10.3390/nu13103442

Abstract

Appropriate supplementation of vitamin D can affect infections, allergy, and mental and behavioral development. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of monitored vitamin D supplementation in a population of preterm infants. 109 preterm infants (24 0/7–32 6/7 weeks of gestation) were randomized to receive 500 IU vitamin D standard therapy (n=55; approximately 800-1000 IU from combined sources) or monitored therapy (n=54; with an option of dose modification). 25(OH)D concentrations were measured at birth, 4 weeks of age, and 35, 40, and 52±2 weeks of post-conceptional age (PCA). Vitamin D supplementation was discontinued in 23% of infants subjected to standard treatment due to increased potentially toxic 25(OH)D concentrations (>90 ng/mL) at 40 weeks of PCA. A significantly higher infants’ percentage in the monitored group had safe vitamin D levels (20–80 ng/mL) at 52 weeks of PCA (p=0.017). We observed increased vitamin D levels and abnormal ultrasound findings in five infants. Biochemical markers of vitamin D toxicity were observed in two patients at 52 weeks of PCA in the control group. Inadequate and excessive amounts of vitamin D can lead to serious health problems. Supplementation with 800–1000 IU of vitamin D prevents deficiency and should be monitored to avoid overdose.

Keywords

vitamin D; osteopenia; prematurity; metabolic bone disease; rickets

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