Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A National Study on Protecting Infrastructure and Public Buildings against Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge

Version 1 : Received: 8 August 2021 / Approved: 10 August 2021 / Online: 10 August 2021 (08:47:00 CEST)

How to cite: Chinowsky, P.; Helman, J. A National Study on Protecting Infrastructure and Public Buildings against Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge. Preprints 2021, 2021080214 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0214.v1). Chinowsky, P.; Helman, J. A National Study on Protecting Infrastructure and Public Buildings against Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge. Preprints 2021, 2021080214 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0214.v1).

Abstract

The national study analyzes sea level rise (SLR) impacts based on 36 different SLR and storm surge scenarios across 5.7 million geographic locations and 3 time periods. Taking an approach based on engineering design guidelines and current cost estimates, the study details projected cost impacts for states, counties, and cities. These impacts are presented from multiple perspectives including total cost, cost per-capita, and cost per-square mile. The purpose of the study is to identify specific locations where infrastructure is vulnerable to rising sea levels. The study finds that Sea Level Rise (SLR) and minimal storm surge is a $400 billion threat to the United States by 2040 that includes a need for at least 50,000 miles of protective barriers. The research is limited in its scope to protecting coastal infrastructure with sea walls. Additional methods exist and may be appropriate in individual situations. The study is original in that it is a national effort to identify infrastructure that is vulnerable as well as the cost associated with protecting this infrastructure.

Keywords

sea level rise; climate change; infrastructure; coastal engineering

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