Preprint Communication Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Amoebic Self Scale and GPA are related to the academic procrastination sensu lato

Version 1 : Received: 4 August 2021 / Approved: 4 August 2021 / Online: 4 August 2021 (14:56:41 CEST)

How to cite: Bielinis, E.; Bielinis, L. The Amoebic Self Scale and GPA are related to the academic procrastination sensu lato. Preprints 2021, 2021080118 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0118.v1). Bielinis, E.; Bielinis, L. The Amoebic Self Scale and GPA are related to the academic procrastination sensu lato. Preprints 2021, 2021080118 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0118.v1).

Abstract

The Amoebic Self Theory is a concept of the social psychology, which postulates that humans have a psychological boundary. As the authors of the concept propose [1], the function of the boundary is to allow psychological separation of one from the others. In this study, we examined how sen-sitivity to violation of the boundary, measured by an amoebic self scale, is connected with differ-ent types of procrastination sensu lato, measured by seven procrastination subscales. Only two of the seven procrastination aspects, i.e. the preference for pressure and outcome satisfaction, were negatively and significantly related to the spatial-symbolic domain of the amoebic self scale. The other purpose of this research was to examine the connection between the students’ grade point average (GPA) and scores obtained in the procrastination subscales. Only the non-adaptive aspect of procrastination predicted significantly the GPA. That is an important detail, because pointing out the gap between one’s self-opinion and the real, non dependent of the opinion, academic achievement. All these findings were considered in the academic context and consequences of these results were discussed.

Keywords

active procrastination; amoebic self-theory; correlation; grade point average; procrastination; procrastination sensu lato

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