Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Characteristics of Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Is It Different from Medical Necrotizing Enterocolitis? A Single-Center Retrospective Study

Version 1 : Received: 29 July 2021 / Approved: 30 July 2021 / Online: 30 July 2021 (09:11:09 CEST)

How to cite: Cho, A.; Ko, D.; Youn, J.; Yang, H.; Kim, H. Characteristics of Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Is It Different from Medical Necrotizing Enterocolitis? A Single-Center Retrospective Study. Preprints 2021, 2021070680 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0680.v1). Cho, A.; Ko, D.; Youn, J.; Yang, H.; Kim, H. Characteristics of Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Is It Different from Medical Necrotizing Enterocolitis? A Single-Center Retrospective Study. Preprints 2021, 2021070680 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0680.v1).

Abstract

Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the leading causes of death in newborns, however, little is understood of which patients can be treated medically or require surgery. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associated factors of surgically treated patients compared to patients requiring only medical treatment. Methods: Patients diagnosed with necrotizing enterocolitis over a period of 14 years in a single children’s hospital were retrospectively enrolled. Demographics and clinical data patients were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 189 patients with NEC were included. Surgically treated patients had a lower gestational age (P = .018), body weight at birth (P = .034), and percentage of exclusive breast milk feeding (P= .001). They had increased comorbidity with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (P = .005), number of days of antibiotic use (P = .014), and length of hospital stay (P = .000). In multivariate logistic analysis, a lower percentage of exclusive breast milk feeding (OR = 0.366, 95% CI: 0.164-0.817) and a longer hospital stay (OR = 1.010, 95% CI: 1.001- 1.019) was associated with surgical NEC. Conclusion: Comparing medical and surgical NEC, a significantly lower percentage of surgical NEC patients were exclusively fed breast milk and their hospital stays were longer.

Keywords

NEC; Surgical; Medical; Risk factor; Outcome; Neonate

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