Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Pre-Intervention Effects of a Community-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Use (LEF); The Role of Participatory Research and Publicity

Version 1 : Received: 13 July 2021 / Approved: 14 July 2021 / Online: 14 July 2021 (14:04:01 CEST)

How to cite: Koning, I.; van der Rijst, V.G.; de Wit, J.B.F.; Kock, C.D. Pre-Intervention Effects of a Community-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Use (LEF); The Role of Participatory Research and Publicity. Preprints 2021, 2021070337 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0337.v1). Koning, I.; van der Rijst, V.G.; de Wit, J.B.F.; Kock, C.D. Pre-Intervention Effects of a Community-Based Intervention Targeting Alcohol Use (LEF); The Role of Participatory Research and Publicity. Preprints 2021, 2021070337 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0337.v1).

Abstract

This study explores the impact of the ‘pre-intervention effects’ of a community-based interventions. This refers to participatory research processes and parallel publicity in the media on changes in alcohol use and relevant mechanisms (rules and norms about alcohol, accessibility of alcohol in a formal setting) among adolescents before any intervention is implemented. In a quasi-experimental study, adolescent data were collected twice by means of self-report among adolescents living in two municipalities (control and experimental condition). Regression analysis showed pre-intervention main effects on adolescents’ perceived accessibility of alcohol in a formal setting. Moreover, among adolescents aged 15 years and older, the normative decline in strictness of rules and norms was less steep in the experimental condition compared to the control condition. Also, adolescents aged 14 years and younger in the experimental condition reported more weekly drinking compared to their peers in the control condition. No differential effects across gender were found. To conclude, applying a co-creational approach in the development of an intervention, not only contributes to more effective interventions in the end, but involvement of and discussions in the community at the start of intervention planning are contributing to changes in targeted factors. This implies that public discussions about the development of intervention strategies should be considered as an essential feature of co-creation in community-based interventions.

Subject Areas

participatory research; pre-intervention; community-based intervention; alcohol use; adolescents

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