Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Association between Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Hypertension: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (Kitchen-9)

Version 1 : Received: 30 June 2021 / Approved: 1 July 2021 / Online: 1 July 2021 (11:53:04 CEST)

How to cite: Nakajima, K.; Igata, M.; Tanaka, K.; Higuchi, R.; Mizusawa, K.; Nakamura, T. Association between Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Hypertension: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (Kitchen-9). Preprints 2021, 2021070024 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0024.v1). Nakajima, K.; Igata, M.; Tanaka, K.; Higuchi, R.; Mizusawa, K.; Nakamura, T. Association between Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Hypertension: Results of Kanagawa Investigation of Total Checkup Data from the National Database-9 (Kitchen-9). Preprints 2021, 2021070024 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0024.v1).

Abstract

Background Although high-density lipoprotein has cardioprotective effects, the association between serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and hypertension is poorly understood. Objective We investigated whether low and high concentrations of HDL-C are associated with hypertension using a large healthcare dataset. Methods In a community-based cross-sectional study of 1,493,152 Japanese people aged 40–74 years who underwent a health checkup, blood pressures and clinical parameters, including nine HDL-C concentrations (20–110 mg/dL or over) were investigated. Results A crude U-shaped relationship was observed between the nine HDL-C concentrations and blood pressure in males (n = 830,669), while a left-to-right inverted J-shaped relationship was observed in females(n = 662,483). An age-adjusted logistic regression analysis showed J-shaped relationships (left-to-right inversion in females) between HDL-C and odds ratios for hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg), with lower limits of 60–79 mg/dL in males and 90–99 mg/dL in females, which were unchanged after adjusting for smoking, habitual exercise, alcohol consumption, and pharmacotherapy for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. However, further adjustment for body mass index and serum triglyceride concentration revealed latent positive linear associations between HDL-C and hypertension, although the association between extremely high HDL-C (≥100 mg/dL) and hypertension was attenuated in non-alcohol drinkers. Conclusion Both low and extremely high HDL-C concentrations are associated with hypertension. The former association may be dependent on excess fat mass, which is often concomitant with low HDL-C, whereas the latter association may be dependent on frequent alcohol consumption.

Keywords

high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; hypertension; blood pressure; low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; extremely high high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; body mass index; big data

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