Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effects of Clinical Characteristics on Sleep Quality in Patients with Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

Version 1 : Received: 21 June 2021 / Approved: 23 June 2021 / Online: 23 June 2021 (11:11:14 CEST)

How to cite: Lee, Y.; Auh, Q.; An, J.; Kim, T. Effects of Clinical Characteristics on Sleep Quality in Patients with Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders. Preprints 2021, 2021060569 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0569.v1). Lee, Y.; Auh, Q.; An, J.; Kim, T. Effects of Clinical Characteristics on Sleep Quality in Patients with Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders. Preprints 2021, 2021060569 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0569.v1).

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate and compare sleep quality between patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder and healthy controls, and to analyze the association of sleep quality with disease characteristics, obstructive sleep apnea risk factors, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Methods: Chronic temporomandibular disorder patients (n=503) and 180 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included, who completed well-organized clinical report and answered questions on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), sleep apnea risk factors (STOP-Bang questionnaire), and excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale). Results: Mean global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly higher in the patients (6.25±2.77) than in healthy controls (6.25±2.77) (p<0.001). Poor sleep was significantly more prevalent in the patient group (56.9%) than in healthy controls (22.2%) (p<0.001). Compared with healthy controls, chronic temporomandibular disorder patients had a higher likelihood of obstructive sleep apnea. (STOP-Bang total score ≥3; 7.2% vs. 16.1%; p<0.01) and higher excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale score ≥10; 12.8% vs. 19.7%; p<0.05). Age (odds ratio=2.551; p<0.001), female sex (odds ratio=1.885; p=0.007), total Epworth sleepiness scale score (odds ratio=1.839; p=0.014), and headache attributed to temporomandibular disorder (odds ratio=1.519; p=0.049) were the most powerful predictors of poor sleep (global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score ≥5) in chronic temporomandibular disorder patients. Conclusion: Chronic temporomandibular disorder patients had sleep quality impairment. Various factors, including peripheral and central factors, affect the patient's sleep quality. Therefore, in addition to sleep quality and sleep-related problems, the underlying central mechanism for poor sleep quality should be assessed when treating chronic temporomandibular disorder patients.

Keywords

Sleep quality; Chronic pain; Temporomandibular disorder; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; STOP-Bang; Epworth Sleepiness Scale

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