Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Optimized Zirconia 3D Printing Using Digital Light Processing with Continuous Film Supply and a Recyclable Slurry System

Version 1 : Received: 14 June 2021 / Approved: 15 June 2021 / Online: 15 June 2021 (08:33:26 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Sarwar, W.A.; Kang, J.-H.; Yoon, H.-I. Optimized Zirconia 3D Printing Using Digital Light Processing with Continuous Film Supply and Recyclable Slurry System. Materials 2021, 14, 3446. Sarwar, W.A.; Kang, J.-H.; Yoon, H.-I. Optimized Zirconia 3D Printing Using Digital Light Processing with Continuous Film Supply and Recyclable Slurry System. Materials 2021, 14, 3446.

Journal reference: Materials 2021, 14, 3446
DOI: 10.3390/ma14133446

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) processes, including stereolithography (SL), can fabricate complex ceramic parts layer by layer using computer-aided design (CAD) models. A ceramic slurry with high solid loading is usually used in SL to fabricate the desired shape, which is further sintered to produce the final part. The traditional SL system utilizes a tank filled with printable material, known as a vat, which for ceramic slurry contributes several limitations and operational difficulties, and further renders it non-recyclable mainly due to its high viscosity and the fragility of the green state. In this study, we utilized a continuous film supply (CFS) printer integrated with a tape casting system using in-house-designed ceramic slurry to print standard prototype specimens. Various printing parameters, including viscosity, layer thickness control, and slurry recycling efficiency, were studied. In addition, post-processing optimizations of the prototype, characterizations, and the microhardness of sintered samples were studied to determine their properties and compare them with traditional methods. The effectiveness of slurry reusability was demonstrated by printing with original and recycled slurry to produce consistent densification of final parts. Post-processing was optimized to achieve a relative sinter density of 99.02% and microhardness of 12.59 GPa. This method provides new opportunities to realize dense complex ceramic features with final properties comparable to those produced by subtractive machining and traditional SL. Furthermore, slurry recycling helps to reduce the overall cost and material consumption.

Subject Areas

zirconia; digital light processing; continuous film supply; recyclable slurry

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