Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Migration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Wound Healing

Version 1 : Received: 12 June 2021 / Approved: 14 June 2021 / Online: 14 June 2021 (15:06:48 CEST)

How to cite: Sorrell, J.M.; Somoza, R.A.; Baber, M.A.; Kenyon, J.; Caplan, A.I. Migration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Wound Healing. Preprints 2021, 2021060374 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0374.v1). Sorrell, J.M.; Somoza, R.A.; Baber, M.A.; Kenyon, J.; Caplan, A.I. Migration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Wound Healing. Preprints 2021, 2021060374 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0374.v1).

Abstract

Bone marrow derived adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) possess therapeutic qualities that enable them to enhance wound repair. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remains poorly understood. Basic mechanisms may include the directed migration of delivered cells to target sites and/or the production and release of soluble factors that act at a distance. Allogeneic and even xenogeneic cells may effectively participate in wound repair. Labeled hMSCs were delivered to full-thickness skin wounds that were created in immunologically competent mice. The delivery occurred on day 3 post-wounding using two different carriers; one which released cells and one which retained cells. The fates of the delivered cells were tracked for up to 25 days. During this period, released cells migrated as a tight cohort deep into the wound to reach the subdermal vascular plexus. Simultaneously, enhanced formation of granulation tissue was evident. This migration of hMSCs was not essential in that enhanced granulation tissue formation and wound contraction occurred when cells were retained in the carrier matrix. This provided further evidence for the release of therapeutic factors by hMSCs to sites of injury.

Subject Areas

Mesenchymal Stem Cells 1; Cell Migration 2; Xenogeneic Wound Repair 3.

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