Preprint Case Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Discharge Plan to Promote Patient Safety and Shared Decision by a Multidisciplinary Team of Healthcare Professionals in a Respiratory Unit

Version 1 : Received: 7 June 2021 / Approved: 9 June 2021 / Online: 9 June 2021 (11:43:00 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 7 July 2021 / Approved: 8 July 2021 / Online: 8 July 2021 (13:19:39 CEST)
Version 3 : Received: 13 July 2021 / Approved: 14 July 2021 / Online: 14 July 2021 (09:58:17 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Nnate, D.A.; Barber, D.; Abaraogu, U.O. Discharge Plan to Promote Patient Safety and Shared Decision Making by a Multidisciplinary Team of Healthcare Professionals in a Respiratory Unit. Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11, 590-599. Nnate, D.A.; Barber, D.; Abaraogu, U.O. Discharge Plan to Promote Patient Safety and Shared Decision Making by a Multidisciplinary Team of Healthcare Professionals in a Respiratory Unit. Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11, 590-599.

Journal reference: Nurs. Rep. 2021, 11, 56
DOI: 10.3390/nursrep11030056

Abstract

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may require frequent hospitalization due to worsening symptoms. Preventing prolonged hospital stay and readmission becomes a challenge for healthcare professionals treating patients with COPD. Although the integration of health and social care supports greater collaboration and enhanced patient care, organisational structure and poor leadership may hinder the implementation of patient-oriented goals. This paper presents a case of a 64-years-old chronic smoker with severe COPD who was to be discharged on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT). It further highlights the healthcare decisions made to ensure the patient’s safety at home, and further provide a long-lasting solution to the existing medical and social needs. The goal was accomplished through a discharge plan that reflects multidisciplinary working, efficient leadership and change management using Havelock’s theory. While COPD is characterized by frequent exacerbation and hospital readmission, it was emphasized that most failed discharge could be attributed to bureaucratic organizational workflow which might not be in the patient’s best interest. It was further demonstrated that healthcare professionals are likely to miss the window of opportunity to apply innovative and long-lasting solutions to the patient’s health condition in an attempt to remedy the immediate symptoms of COPD.

Keywords

chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; discharge plan; leadership; multidisciplinary team; respiratory medicine; patient safety; pulmonary rehabilitation.

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