Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Effect of Street Orientation on Outdoor Thermal Comfort in a Cold Mountainous Climate

Version 1 : Received: 26 May 2021 / Approved: 27 May 2021 / Online: 27 May 2021 (08:02:05 CEST)

How to cite: Delpak, N.; Sajadzadeh, H.; Hasanpourfard, S.; Aram, F. The Effect of Street Orientation on Outdoor Thermal Comfort in a Cold Mountainous Climate. Preprints 2021, 2021050654 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0654.v1). Delpak, N.; Sajadzadeh, H.; Hasanpourfard, S.; Aram, F. The Effect of Street Orientation on Outdoor Thermal Comfort in a Cold Mountainous Climate. Preprints 2021, 2021050654 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0654.v1).

Abstract

Lack of due attention to the orientation of streets and establishment of urban blocks without regard for climatic characteristics and conditions of the environment have an adverse effect on thermal comfort in open urban spaces. Construction of new settlements without taking into account climatic requirements undermines thermal comfort for pedestrians and other users, especially in cold regions. Considering the coldness of the region under study and the significance of the orientation of streets in absorbing radiation and providing heat to outdoor urban spaces, this study investigates the effect of the orientation of streets on microclimatic comfort in one of the residential towns of Hamadan City in Iran. For this purpose, microclimate simulation was performed using ENVI-met software. A residential block with four different orientations (the most common orientations of its surrounding buildings) were simulated in the coldest day of winter and the hottest day of summer. The results suggest that streets have different thermal behavior in different orientations. Orientation affects mean radiant temperature (Tmrt), the duration of exposure to direct sunlight, wind speed, and physiological equivalent temperature (PET), which are all important factors in thermal comfort. Based on these findings, north-south streets in Hamedan receive more radiant temperature during winter compared to other simulated orientations and provide more desirable thermal comfort. The average PET value on a winter day at a point on the north-south passage was 4.5-8 °C warmer than other orientations. In summer, streets with intercardinal orientations (i.e., northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast) provided the lowest PET (about 2 °C cooler than other orientations) and better thermal comfort

Supplementary and Associated Material

Subject Areas

Thermal Comfort; Outdoor Space; Microclimate Simulation; Street Orientation; Physiological Equivalent Temperature

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