Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Methodology for Addressing Infectious Aerosol Persistence in Real-Time Using Sensor Network

Version 1 : Received: 25 April 2021 / Approved: 28 April 2021 / Online: 28 April 2021 (10:32:57 CEST)

How to cite: Makhsous, S.; Segovia, J.M.; He, J.; Chan, D.; Lee, L.; Novosselov, I.V.; Mamishev, A.V. Methodology for Addressing Infectious Aerosol Persistence in Real-Time Using Sensor Network. Preprints 2021, 2021040744 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0744.v1). Makhsous, S.; Segovia, J.M.; He, J.; Chan, D.; Lee, L.; Novosselov, I.V.; Mamishev, A.V. Methodology for Addressing Infectious Aerosol Persistence in Real-Time Using Sensor Network. Preprints 2021, 2021040744 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0744.v1).

Abstract

Human exposure to infectious aerosols results a transmission of diseases, such as influenza, tuberculosis, and COVID-19. Most dental procedures generate a significant number of aerosolized particles, increasing transmission risk in dental settings. Since the generation of aerosols in dentistry is unavoidable, many clinics started using intervention strategies such as area-filtration units and extraoral evacuation equipment, especially under the relatively recent constraints of the pandemics. However, the effectiveness of these devices in dental operatories has not been studied. Therefore, the dental personnel's ability to position and operate such instruments efficiently is also limited. To address these challenges, we utilized a real-time sensor network for assessment of aerosol dynamics during dental restoration and cleaning producers with and without intervention. The strategies tested during the procedures were (i) local area high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters and (ii) extra-oral suction device (EOSD). The study was conducted at the University of Washington School of Dentistry using a network of thirteen fixed sensors positioned within the operatory and one wearable sensor worn by the dental operator. The sensor network provides time and space-resolved particulate matter (PM) data. Three-dimensional (3D) visualization informs aerosol persistence in the operatory. It was found that area filters did not improve the overall aerosol concentration in dental offices significantly. An average of 16% decrease in PM concentration was observed when EOSD equipment was used during the procedures. The combination of real-time sensors and 3D visualization can provide dental personnel and facility mangers with actionable feedback to effectively assess aerosol transmission in medical settings and develop evidence-based intervention strategies.

Subject Areas

Aerosols; dental clinics; infection control; high-volume evacuation; extra-oral suction device; particle concentration; sensor network; dispersion modeling; exposure assessment; air quality

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.