Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Assessment and Characterization of Reed Canary Grass Plantations for Energy

Version 1 : Received: 26 April 2021 / Approved: 27 April 2021 / Online: 27 April 2021 (12:38:38 CEST)

How to cite: Mola-Yudego, B.; Xu, X.; Englund, O.; Dimitriou, I. Assessment and Characterization of Reed Canary Grass Plantations for Energy. Preprints 2021, 2021040715 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0715.v1). Mola-Yudego, B.; Xu, X.; Englund, O.; Dimitriou, I. Assessment and Characterization of Reed Canary Grass Plantations for Energy. Preprints 2021, 2021040715 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0715.v1).

Abstract

Research Highlights: (1) Reed canary grass (RCG) is analysed in Sweden compared to willow and poplar for 2001-2020 (2) Each crop presents a different land-use and climatic profile (3) Average yield records of reed canary grass are similar to willow and poplar (4) There are divergences between trial-based and commercial yields (5) Existing LUC patterns suggest meadow>RCG and RCG>cereal (6) RCG land area is very sensitive to policy incentives. Background and objectives: RCG is an alternative crop for biomass-to-energy due to high yield and frost tolerance. We assess the cultivation in Sweden by using an extensive compilation of data, with emphasis on the extension of the cultivation, areas planted, climatic profile, land use patterns and yield levels. Material and methods: All RCG plantations are analysed for 2001-2020. A geostatistical analysis is performed to characterize where is cultivated and the land uses associated. Climatic, productivity and yield profiles are compared to willow and poplar plantations, from experiments and from commercial plantations. Results: The results show that the cultivation of reed canary grass expanded after 2005, with a maximum of 800 ha in 2009 to then decrease to the current levels of about 550 ha. It is mainly grown in colder climatic areas, with lower agricultural productivity than willow and poplar. Mean yields from trials are 6 odt ha-1 yr-1; commercial yields are 3.5 odt ha-1 yr-1. RCG replace meadow land and is replaced by cereals, when abandoned. Conclusions: Reed canary grass is an interesting alternative, growing on colder areas but on similar yield levels than other energy crops. The cultivation is more sensitive to policy incentives

Subject Areas

energy crops; land use; biomass; bioenergy

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