Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Sustainability Analysis of the Production of Early Stages of the Atlantic Forest Lambari (Deuterodon iguape) in a public hatchery at a rainforest conservation area

Version 1 : Received: 1 April 2021 / Approved: 5 April 2021 / Online: 5 April 2021 (12:19:46 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Belmudes, D.; David, F.S.; Gonçalves, F.H.; Valenti, W.C. Sustainability Analysis of the Production of Early Stages of the Atlantic Forest Lambari (Deuterodon iguape) in a Public Hatchery at a Rainforest Conservation Area. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5934. Belmudes, D.; David, F.S.; Gonçalves, F.H.; Valenti, W.C. Sustainability Analysis of the Production of Early Stages of the Atlantic Forest Lambari (Deuterodon iguape) in a Public Hatchery at a Rainforest Conservation Area. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5934.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2021, 13, 5934
DOI: 10.3390/su13115934

Abstract

Protected areas have been used worldwide to conserve natural resources. Nevertheless, economic activities to provide income for communities living inside and surrounding conservation areas remain an issue. This study aimed to assess the sustainability of a Deuterodon iguape hatchery, placed inside an Atlantic Rainforest Park, to leverage this small native fish's grow-out farming, affording income and food security for local families. We have used a set of indicators of economic, social, and environmental sustainability. The initial investment is about US$ 40,000, which returned in ~2 years. The internal rate of return is close to 50%, including the externality costs, which is attractive for public and private investments. The hatchery generated few direct jobs, but the workforce can be recruited in the community, and hatchery can enable the establishment of several small grow-out farms, leveraging the development of indirect jobs and self-employments. The system had a low environmental impact, showing minor release of pollutants, low risk for biodiversity, and absorption of 18 g of CO2 equivalent per thousand post-larvae produced, contributing to the struggle against climate change. Therefore, D. iguape hatchery demonstrates the potential of combining biodiversity conservation and income generation, meeting the Sustainable Development Goals of Agenda 2030.

Keywords

sustainability; hatchery; SDG; lambari; conservation unit; rural farm; Deuterodon iguape

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