Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Analysis of Arctic Spring Ozone Anomaly in the Phases of QBO and 11-year Solar Cycle for 1979–2011

Version 1 : Received: 1 April 2021 / Approved: 2 April 2021 / Online: 2 April 2021 (11:40:56 CEST)

How to cite: Yamashita, Y.; Akiyoshi, H.; Takahashi, M. Analysis of Arctic Spring Ozone Anomaly in the Phases of QBO and 11-year Solar Cycle for 1979–2011. Preprints 2021, 2021040057 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0057.v1). Yamashita, Y.; Akiyoshi, H.; Takahashi, M. Analysis of Arctic Spring Ozone Anomaly in the Phases of QBO and 11-year Solar Cycle for 1979–2011. Preprints 2021, 2021040057 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0057.v1).

Abstract

Arctic ozone amount in winter to spring shows large year-to-year variation. This study investigates Arctic spring ozone in relation to the phase of quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO)/the 11-year solar cycle, using satellite observations, reanalysis data, and outputs of a chemistry climate model (CCM) during the period of 1979–2011. For this duration, we found that the composite mean of the Northern Hemisphere high-latitude total ozone in the QBO-westerly (QBO-W)/solar minimum (Smin) phase is slightly smaller than those averaged for the QBO-W/Smax and QBO-E/Smax years in March. An analysis of a passive ozone tracer in the CCM simulation indicates that this negative anomaly is primarily caused by transport. The negative anomaly is consistent with a weakening of the residual mean downward motion in the polar lower stratosphere. The contribution of chemical processes estimated using the column amount difference between ozone and the passive ozone tracer is between 10–20% of the total anomaly in March. The lower ozone levels in the Arctic spring during the QBO-W/Smin years are associated with a stronger Arctic polar vortex from late winter to early spring, which is linked to the reduced occurrence of sudden stratospheric warming in the winter during the QBO-W/Smin years.

Subject Areas

Arctic ozone; QBO; 11-year solar cycle; sudden stratospheric warming; chemistry-climate model

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