Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Chronic Effectiveness of Walking With Blood Flow Restriction on the Activation and Strength in Osteoporotic Older Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Version 1 : Received: 18 March 2021 / Approved: 19 March 2021 / Online: 19 March 2021 (11:11:26 CET)

How to cite: Bittar, S.T.; Santos, H.H.; Leandro, L.S.; Oliveira, L.S.; Cirilo-Sousa, M.S. Chronic Effectiveness of Walking With Blood Flow Restriction on the Activation and Strength in Osteoporotic Older Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Preprints 2021, 2021030497 Bittar, S.T.; Santos, H.H.; Leandro, L.S.; Oliveira, L.S.; Cirilo-Sousa, M.S. Chronic Effectiveness of Walking With Blood Flow Restriction on the Activation and Strength in Osteoporotic Older Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Preprints 2021, 2021030497

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Blood flow restriction (BFR) has been investigated as an alternative method combined with resistance training or AT to promote different health benefits for older people. Nevertheless, no study analyzed chronic effects of BFR on muscle activation in this population, and in some investigations, the application of BFR has been employed arbitrary pressures, which can be a serious methodological error, both from the results and of the risk to the health of the older. Thus, this study analyzed the effect of 24 weeks of walking with BFR on activation and muscle strength in elderly women with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: Thirty older women (66.0±4.6 years) performed randomly to one of three training groups: WALK (moderate-intensity walking), WALK+BFR (low-intensity walking with BFR), or BFR (BFR alone). Muscle activation (sEMG) and strength of knee flexors and extensors were measured pre-intervention and after 12 and 24 weeks. Results: Only a trivial effect size (ES) for the WALK+BFR (ES= 0.16) was observed in sEMG of the knee flexors compared to WALK. A moderate effect was observed in sEMG of the knee extensors (ES= 0.65) for the WALK+BFR compared to the WALK. However, adverse effects were found in the strength of the knee flexors for the BFR (ES= −0.86) and WALK+BFR (ES= −0.69) compared to WALK. Adverse and null effects, respectively for the BFR (ES= −0.16) and WALK+BFR (ES= 0.06) groups, were also observed on the strength gain of the knee extensors. Conclusions: Low-intensity walk combined with BFR does not provide relevant chronic effects on strength gain or even limit muscle strength gain, however, due to greater activation of knee extensors over 24 weeks, it is possible to benefit from the use of similar strategies to obtain neuromuscular gains in the long‐term for elderly women with osteopenia and osteoporosis.

Subject Areas

aging; aerobic exercise; vascular occlusion; electromyography

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