Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Lifestyle Factors and Metabolically Unhealthy Obesity in Youth. Findings from the OSPEL Study

Version 1 : Received: 17 March 2021 / Approved: 18 March 2021 / Online: 18 March 2021 (11:03:09 CET)

How to cite: Ellulu, M.S.; Brito, A.; De Beaufort, C.; Bohn, T.; Guinhouya, B.; Samouda, H. Lifestyle Factors and Metabolically Unhealthy Obesity in Youth. Findings from the OSPEL Study. Preprints 2021, 2021030476 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0476.v1). Ellulu, M.S.; Brito, A.; De Beaufort, C.; Bohn, T.; Guinhouya, B.; Samouda, H. Lifestyle Factors and Metabolically Unhealthy Obesity in Youth. Findings from the OSPEL Study. Preprints 2021, 2021030476 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0476.v1).

Abstract

Metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUO) was associated with increased cardiometabolic risk. However, it is not fully understood which lifestyle factors are associated with MUO in youth. We aimed to investigate the relationship between MUO and lifestyle patterns in youth. 7-17 years old youth with overweight (N=48; 60.4% girls) and obesity (N=71; 56.3% girls) were recruited in the Pediatric Clinic, Luxembourg (cross-sectional study). Eating and sedentary habits, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and vigorous physical activity (VPA) were assessed. 72.3% of the participants had MUO. Multivariable logistic regressions showed that MUO is most likely to be associated with moderate to low weekly levels of MVPA [OR: 2.09 (95% CI: 1.07 – 4.09; p = 0.030)] and moderate to high weekly soda and lemonade drinks consumption [OR: 2.92 (95% CI: 1.32 – 6.48; p = 0.008)]. After adjustment for age, gender and Tanner stages, MUO was most likely to be associated with moderate to high soda and lemonade drinks consumption [OR: 2.72 (95% CI: 1.21– 6.12; p = 0.016)] and with Tanner stages [OR: 2.06 (95% CI: 1.08– 3.94; p = 0.029)]. We support the promotion of MVPA and the moderation in the sugar-sweetened beverages consumption to manage cardiometabolic health in youth with obesity.

Keywords

Overweight; Obesity paradox; Physical activity; Nutrition; Sugar-sweetened beverages

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