Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Telecommuting, Off-Time Work, and Intrusive Leadership in Workers’ Well-Being

Version 1 : Received: 27 February 2021 / Approved: 1 March 2021 / Online: 1 March 2021 (14:43:47 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Magnavita, N.; Tripepi, G.; Chiorri, C. Telecommuting, Off-Time Work, and Intrusive Leadership in Workers’ Well-Being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3330. Magnavita, N.; Tripepi, G.; Chiorri, C. Telecommuting, Off-Time Work, and Intrusive Leadership in Workers’ Well-Being. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3330.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3330
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18073330

Abstract

Telecommuting is a flexible form of work that has progressively spread over the last 40 years and which has been strongly encouraged by the measures to limit the Covid19 pandemic. There is still limited evi-dence on the effects it has on workers' health. In this survey we invited 905 workers of companies that made a limited use of telework to fill out a questionnaire to evaluate: Intrusive leadership of managers (IL), the request for work outside traditional hours (OFF-TAJD), workaholism (BWAS), effort / reward imbalance (ERI), happiness and common mental issues (CMIs), anxiety and depression, assessed by the Goldberg scale (GADS). The interaction between these variables has been studied by structural equation modeling (SEM). Intrusive leadership and working after hours were significantly associated with occu-pational stress. Workaholism is a relevant moderator of this interaction: intrusive leadership significantly increased the stress of workaholic workers. Intrusive leadership and overtime work were associated with reduced happiness, anxiety and depression. These results indicate the need to guarantee the right to disconnect, to limit the effect of the OFF-TAJD. In addition to this, companies should implement policies to prevent intrusive leadership and workaholism.

Subject Areas

smart work; psychosocial stressors; health promotion; work-related stress; Covid-19; anxiety; depression; happiness

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