Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Color Changes in Ag Nanoparticle Aggregates Placed in Various Environments: Their Application to Air Monitoring

Version 1 : Received: 18 February 2021 / Approved: 19 February 2021 / Online: 19 February 2021 (09:52:47 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Ozaki, K.; Nishiyama, F.; Takahiro, K. Color Changes in Ag Nanoparticle Aggregates Placed in Various Environments: Their Application to Air Monitoring. Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 701. Ozaki, K.; Nishiyama, F.; Takahiro, K. Color Changes in Ag Nanoparticle Aggregates Placed in Various Environments: Their Application to Air Monitoring. Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 701.

Journal reference: Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 701
DOI: 10.3390/nano11030701

Abstract

Fresh Ag nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on a transparent SiO2 exhibit an intense optical extinction band originating in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in visible range. The intensity of LSPR band weakened when the Ag NPs was stored in ambient air for two weeks. The rate of the weakening and the LSPR wavelength shift, corresponding to visual chromatic changes, strongly depended on the environment in which Ag NPs were set. The origin of a chromatic change was discussed along with both compositional and morphological changes. In one case, bluish coloring followed by a prompt discoloring was observed for Ag NPs placed near the ventilation fan in our laboratory, resulted from adsorption of large amounts of S and Cl on Ag NP surfaces as well as particle coarsening. Such color changes deduce the presence of significant amounts of S and Cl in the environment. In other case, a remarkably blue-shift of LSPR band was observed for the Ag NPs stored in the desiccator made of stainless steel, originated in the formation of CN and/or HCN compounds and surface roughening. Their color changed from maroon to reddish, suggesting that such molecules were present inside the desiccator.

Subject Areas

Ag nanoparticle; localized surface plasmon resonance; color; red-shift; blue-shift

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