Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Vaccine Quality is a Key Factor to Determine Thermal Stability of Commercial Newcastle Disease (ND) Vaccines

Version 1 : Received: 7 February 2021 / Approved: 10 February 2021 / Online: 10 February 2021 (08:23:38 CET)

How to cite: Osman, N.; Goovaerts, D.; Serageldeen, S.; Grund, C. Vaccine Quality is a Key Factor to Determine Thermal Stability of Commercial Newcastle Disease (ND) Vaccines. Preprints 2021, 2021020246 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0246.v1). Osman, N.; Goovaerts, D.; Serageldeen, S.; Grund, C. Vaccine Quality is a Key Factor to Determine Thermal Stability of Commercial Newcastle Disease (ND) Vaccines. Preprints 2021, 2021020246 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0246.v1).

Abstract

Vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND), a devastating viral disease of chicken, is often hampered by thermal inactivation of the live vaccines, in particular in tropical and hot climate conditions. In the past “thermostable” vaccine strains (I-2) have been proposed to overcome this problem. In the current study, we compared the thermal stability of 6 commercially available ND vaccines. Subjected to 37°C as lyophilized preparation, two vaccines containing I-2 strains were more sensitive to inactivation than a third I-2 vaccine or when compared to three other vaccines based on different strains. However, after reconstitution strains proved to have a comparable tenacity. Interestingly, all vaccines retained a sufficient virus dose for protection (106 EID50) after 1 day at 37°C, still. However, experiments exposing ND-vaccines to elevated temperatures of 51°C and 61°C, clearly demonstrated inactivation of all dissolved vaccines within 2 to 4 hours. The data indicate preparation that specific factors may influence thermal stability rather than strain specific characteristics. Regardless of the ND strain used, the appropriate cold chain is mandatory for live ND-vaccines.

Subject Areas

Newcastle disease virus; Paramyxovirus; vaccine quality; vaccine stability; heat stability

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