Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Assessment of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Al(III) Removal Capacity of Bacteria From Food and Gut Ecological Niches: Insights Into Biodiversity to Limit Intestinal Biodisponibility of Toxic Metals

Version 1 : Received: 25 January 2021 / Approved: 26 January 2021 / Online: 26 January 2021 (13:26:26 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

George, F.; Mahieux, S.; Daniel, C.; Titécat, M.; Beauval, N.; Houcke, I.; Neut, C.; Allorge, D.; Borges, F.; Jan, G.; Foligné, B.; Garat, A. Assessment of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Al(III) Removal Capacity of Bacteria from Food and Gut Ecological Niches: Insights into Biodiversity to Limit Intestinal Biodisponibility of Toxic Metals. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 456. George, F.; Mahieux, S.; Daniel, C.; Titécat, M.; Beauval, N.; Houcke, I.; Neut, C.; Allorge, D.; Borges, F.; Jan, G.; Foligné, B.; Garat, A. Assessment of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Al(III) Removal Capacity of Bacteria from Food and Gut Ecological Niches: Insights into Biodiversity to Limit Intestinal Biodisponibility of Toxic Metals. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 456.

Journal reference: Microorganisms 2021, 9, 456
DOI: 10.3390/microorganisms9020456

Abstract

Hazardous toxic metals, such as lead and cadmium, and to a lesser extent aluminum, are extensively recognized as detrimental for health following ingestion within food and water, or following inhalation. Gut and food-derived microbes, by interacting with heavy metals, may actively or passively modulate their bioavailability inside the gut, either by adsorption or by sequestration. Such a bioremediation within the gut implies the selection of safe microbes, based on their specific capacities to immobilize metals. We investigated the metal removal ability of 225 bacteria toward the potential harmful trace elements lead, cadmium and aluminum in vitro, using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis. Interspecies and intraspecies comparisons were addressed and discussed among bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes, which are mostly lactic acid bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp, with some Lactococcus, Pediococcus and Carnobacterium representatives, Actinobacteria as well as Proteobacteria. The effect on mixture of lead and cadmium was also investigated. Although the purpose of such a screening is so far not to elucidate each of the various strain specific- and metal dependent- mechanisms of heavy metal removal, we identified potential bacteria which are able to alleviate Pb(II) and Cd(II) concerns in order to propose performing candidate probiotics for metal xenobiotic bioremediation.

Subject Areas

Bioremediation; gut microbiota; lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacterales; lead; cadmium; aluminum; Probiotics; ICP-MS

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