Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Woman’s Needs and Satisfaction Regarding the Communication With Doctors and Midwives During Labour, Delivery and Early Postpartum

Version 1 : Received: 8 January 2021 / Approved: 11 January 2021 / Online: 11 January 2021 (17:46:12 CET)

How to cite: Baranowska, B.; Pawlicka, P.; Kiersnowska, I.; Misztal, A.; Kajdy, A.; Sys, D.; Doroszewska, A. Woman’s Needs and Satisfaction Regarding the Communication With Doctors and Midwives During Labour, Delivery and Early Postpartum. Preprints 2021, 2021010205 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0205.v1). Baranowska, B.; Pawlicka, P.; Kiersnowska, I.; Misztal, A.; Kajdy, A.; Sys, D.; Doroszewska, A. Woman’s Needs and Satisfaction Regarding the Communication With Doctors and Midwives During Labour, Delivery and Early Postpartum. Preprints 2021, 2021010205 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0205.v1).

Abstract

The study aims to identify the difference in communication needs of women giving birth and women during puerperium. An additional goal includes the analysis of the experience and communication needs through the context of a woman's approach to childbirth. The study is a prospective, cross-sectional, self-report survey. 521 women between 5 and 10 days after birth participated in the study. Women perceived information provided by the medical staff as the most helpful aspect of verbal communication both during labour and puerperium. Maintaining eye contact with the medical staff was perceived as the most helpful aspect of non-verbal communication. Women were more satisfied with communication during labour and birth than in the maternity ward and those after non-instrumental childbirth were more satisfied with communication compared to the instrumental birth group. Women perceiving childbirth as the natural, physiological process considered verbal and non-verbal communication during and after childbirth as less helpful than women perceiving birth as more risky and requiring interventions. The results of the study emphasize the importance of verbal and non-verbal communication during birth and puerperium and different communication needs during labour and early postpartum. It also showed that women who perceive labour as a physiological process seem to be less dependent on the communication with the medical staff than women who accept medical interventions during labour and birth as necessary.

Subject Areas

communication; childbirth; satisfaction; quality of care

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