Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Student annotations of published data as a collaboration between an online laboratory course and the C. elegans database, WormBase.

Version 1 : Received: 7 January 2021 / Approved: 8 January 2021 / Online: 8 January 2021 (16:55:14 CET)

How to cite: Grove, C.; Ismail, S.; Hulsey-Vincent, H.; Dahlberg, C. Student annotations of published data as a collaboration between an online laboratory course and the C. elegans database, WormBase.. Preprints 2021, 2021010169 Grove, C.; Ismail, S.; Hulsey-Vincent, H.; Dahlberg, C. Student annotations of published data as a collaboration between an online laboratory course and the C. elegans database, WormBase.. Preprints 2021, 2021010169

Abstract

faculty research while expanding the availability of research opportunities. One important aspect of CUREs is student’s engagement in collaboration. We developed a partnership with the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) database, WormBase, in which students submitted annotations of published manuscripts to the website. This activity provided students with a collaborative research activity that benefitted the greater scientific community and enhanced students’ understanding of molecular genetics during the COVID-19 pandemic. WormBase relies on community annotators to read published articles and input phenotypic data. Students submitted a total of nine annotations directly to WormBase, which were curated by WormBase to ensure correctness and to reduce overlap from redundant annotations. Due to the stress on students during this time of crisis, qualitative data were collected in lieu of quantitative pre-post analyses. Students described their learning experiences in terms of interactions with the scientific community and the “real world”, content knowledge and competencies, and changes in perspectives and use of resources. Students also reported that this activity was helpful in their understanding of critical molecular genetics concepts. Most students reported on cognitive processes that represent mid-level Bloom’s categories. The shift to online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic created an immediate need for meaningful, collaborative experiences in CUREs. By partnering with WormBase, students gained insight into the scientific community and contributed as community members. We describe possible modifications for future courses, potential expansion of the WormBase collaboration, and future directions for quantitative analysis.

Subject Areas

Collaboration, annotate, WormBase, C. elegans, Course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE), genetics, scientific community.

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