Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Feasibility, Acceptability, and Outcomes of a Yoga-Based Meditation Intervention for Hospice Professionals to Combat Burnout

Version 1 : Received: 28 December 2020 / Approved: 29 December 2020 / Online: 29 December 2020 (08:28:50 CET)

How to cite: Heeter, C.; Allbritton, M.; Lehto, R.; Miller, P.; McDaniel, P.; Paletta, M. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Outcomes of a Yoga-Based Meditation Intervention for Hospice Professionals to Combat Burnout. Preprints 2020, 2020120716 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0716.v1). Heeter, C.; Allbritton, M.; Lehto, R.; Miller, P.; McDaniel, P.; Paletta, M. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Outcomes of a Yoga-Based Meditation Intervention for Hospice Professionals to Combat Burnout. Preprints 2020, 2020120716 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0716.v1).

Abstract

Abstract: 1) Background. This research examined feasibility, acceptability and outcomes of delivering a 6-week yoga-based meditation intervention to clinical teams of hospice professionals (HPs) at a large non-profit hospice organization. The intervention was designed to increase mind-body integration and combat burnout. The manuscript was written for different audiences including research scientists who study interoception, burnout, meditation, or yoga, designers of meditation interventions, and hospice organizations looking for ways to mitigate HP burnout. 2) Methods. The intervention was launched within clinical teams, beginning with a half hour online introduction to the program and exposure to the week 1 meditation at each team’s monthly all-staff meeting. Throughout the program, HPs could access the meditations on their own via their workplace computers, tablets, and smartphones. Online pre- and post-intervention surveys with 151 HPs assessed burnout using the Professional Fulfillment Index and mind-body integration using the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness sub-scales. 3) Results. Half of HPs expressed a desire to continue to have access to the meditations after the 6-week program ended. Due to covid-19 work from home restrictions, three-fourth of HPs did a meditation at home, 29% in a car between patient visits (not while driving), and 23% at the office. Higher interoceptive awareness was significantly related to lower burnout, particularly lower work exhaustion. Meditation frequency was significantly related to higher interoceptive awareness but not to burnout. 4) Conclusions. Findings showed that yoga-based meditation intervention was feasible and acceptable and associated with higher interoceptive awareness. The results point to a role for interoceptive awareness in reducing the risk for burnout.

Subject Areas

meditation; burnout; interoception

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