Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Literature Review of Dietary Habits, Defecation Habits and Skill Care to Prevent Fecal Incontinence in Elderly Individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Version 1 : Received: 27 December 2020 / Approved: 28 December 2020 / Online: 28 December 2020 (13:24:54 CET)

How to cite: Okawa, Y. A Literature Review of Dietary Habits, Defecation Habits and Skill Care to Prevent Fecal Incontinence in Elderly Individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Preprints 2020, 2020120706 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0706.v1). Okawa, Y. A Literature Review of Dietary Habits, Defecation Habits and Skill Care to Prevent Fecal Incontinence in Elderly Individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Preprints 2020, 2020120706 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0706.v1).

Abstract

The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is functional gastrointestinal tract disease, include abnormal defecation and abdominal pain. The Rome IV criteria define fecal incontinence as "recurrent and uncontrolled stool leakage that lasts more than 3 months." Fecal incontinence is common in patients with IBS and can have a significant negative impact on daily life and reduce the patient's quality of life. Diet and lifestyle guidance are needed to prevent fecal incontinence. Fecal incontinence can be reduced by ingesting dietary fiber, which can improve stool properties, and avoiding foods with stool-softening properties. Additionally, defecation habit guidance is important for preventing fecal incontinence. If rectal sensation is normal, it is recommended to go to the bathroom as soon as there is a desire to defecate. In elderly people, if there is stool in the rectum due to decreased rectal sensation and it continues to accumulate in the rectum without triggering the urge to defecate, overflowing leaky fecal incontinence may occur. For such patients, defecation habit training teaching them to defecate even if they do not have the desire to defecate may be effective. Education and advice on defecation reduces fecal incontinence and is beneficial to caregivers.

Subject Areas

fecal incontinence; unconscious elderly; irritable bowel syndrome; gastrointestinal symptoms; constipation; diarrhea

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