Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Progenitor Regulation: How Many Pieces in the Puzzle?

Version 1 : Received: 26 December 2020 / Approved: 28 December 2020 / Online: 28 December 2020 (12:40:17 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Peired, A.J.; Melica, M.E.; Molli, A.; Nardi, C.; Romagnani, P.; Lasagni, L. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Progenitor Regulation: How Many Pieces in the Puzzle? Cells 2021, 10, 59. Peired, A.J.; Melica, M.E.; Molli, A.; Nardi, C.; Romagnani, P.; Lasagni, L. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Progenitor Regulation: How Many Pieces in the Puzzle? Cells 2021, 10, 59.

Journal reference: Cells 2021, 10, 59
DOI: 10.3390/cells10010059

Abstract

Kidneys of mice, rats and humans possess progenitors that maintain daily homeostasis and take part in endogenous regenerative processes following injury, owing to their capacity to proliferate and differentiate. In the glomerular and tubular compartments of the nephron, consistent studies demonstrated that well-characterized, distinct populations of progenitor cells, localized in the parietal epithelium of Bowman capsule and scattered in the proximal and distal tubules, could generate segment-specific cells in physiological conditions and following tissue injury. However, defective or abnormal regenerative responses of these progenitors can contribute to pathologic conditions. The molecular characteristics of renal progenitors have been extensively studied, revealing that numerous classical and evolutionarily conserved pathways, such as Notch or Wnt/β-catenin, play a major role in cell regulation. Others, such as retinoic acid, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, TLR2 (Toll-Like Receptor 2) and leptin, are also important in this process. In this review, we summarize the plethora of molecular mechanisms directing renal progenitor responses during homeostasis and following kidney injury. Finally, we will explore how single cell RNA sequencing could bring the characterization of renal progenitors to the next level, while knowing their molecular signature is gaining relevance in the clinic.

Subject Areas

renal progenitors; molecular mechanisms; kidney injury; single cell RNA sequencing; molecular signature

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