Working Paper Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Probiotics Supplements Reduce ER Stress and Gut Inflammation Associated With Gliadin Intake in Celiac Disease Mouse Model

Version 1 : Received: 22 December 2020 / Approved: 23 December 2020 / Online: 23 December 2020 (09:56:25 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 28 December 2020 / Approved: 28 December 2020 / Online: 28 December 2020 (16:59:04 CET)

How to cite: Ferrari, E.; Monzani, R.; Saverio, V.; Gagliardi, M.; Pańczyszyn, E.; Raia, V.; Villella, V.R.; Pane, M.; Amoruso, A.; Corazzari, M. Probiotics Supplements Reduce ER Stress and Gut Inflammation Associated With Gliadin Intake in Celiac Disease Mouse Model. Preprints 2020, 2020120581 Ferrari, E.; Monzani, R.; Saverio, V.; Gagliardi, M.; Pańczyszyn, E.; Raia, V.; Villella, V.R.; Pane, M.; Amoruso, A.; Corazzari, M. Probiotics Supplements Reduce ER Stress and Gut Inflammation Associated With Gliadin Intake in Celiac Disease Mouse Model. Preprints 2020, 2020120581

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to dietary protein, gluten, from wheat rye and barley. It occurs in about 1% worldwide population, in genetically predisposed individuals bearing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2/DQ8. Gut epithelial cell stress and innate immune activation are responsible for breaking oral tolerance to gliadin, the gluten component. To date, the only treatment available for CD is a long-term gluten-free diet. Several evidences show that an altered composition of the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) could play a key role in the pathogenesis of CD, through the modulation of intestinal permeability and the regulation of the immune system. Here we show that gliadin induces a chronic ER stress condition in the small intestine of a CD mouse model and that the co-administration of probiotics efficiently attenuates both UPR and gut inflammation. Moreover, the composition of probiotics formulations might differ in their activity at molecular level, especially toward the three axes of the UPR. Therefore, rebalancing the gut microbiota composition by probiotics administration might rep-resent a new strategy to treat CD affected patients.

Subject Areas

CD; UPR; TG2; CFTR; probiotics

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 28 December 2020
Commenter: Marco Corazzari
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: the section '2.3 Probiotics formulations' (Mat&Met) should be corrected as follows:

Probiotics were supplied by PROBIOTICAL SpA, in lyophilized powder. The P1 formulation contains two strains of Bifidobacterium breve, the B632 (DSM 24706) and BR03 (DSM16604) at 2x109 live cells (AFU)/g, while the P2 formulation contains the Lactobacillus plantarum LP14 (DSM 33401), L. casei subsp. paracasei LPC09 (DSM 24243) and the Lactobacillus rhamnosus LR04 (DSM 16605) at 3x109 live cells (AFU)/g. The study materials were analyzed by Probiotical Research srl, Novara, Italy, via flow cytometry (ISO 19344:2015 IDF 232:2015) to confirm target cell count. P1 or P2 were resuspended in PBS and administrated as described.

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