Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Probiotics Supplements Reduce ER Stress and Gut Inflammation Associated With Gliadin Intake in Celiac Disease Mouse Model

Version 1 : Received: 22 December 2020 / Approved: 23 December 2020 / Online: 23 December 2020 (09:56:25 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 28 December 2020 / Approved: 28 December 2020 / Online: 28 December 2020 (16:59:04 CET)

How to cite: Ferrari, E.; Monzani, R.; Saverio, V.; Gagliardi, M.; Pańczyszyn, E.; Raia, V.; Villella, V.R.; Pane, M.; Amoruso, A.; Corazzari, M. Probiotics Supplements Reduce ER Stress and Gut Inflammation Associated With Gliadin Intake in Celiac Disease Mouse Model. Preprints 2020, 2020120581 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0581.v1). Ferrari, E.; Monzani, R.; Saverio, V.; Gagliardi, M.; Pańczyszyn, E.; Raia, V.; Villella, V.R.; Pane, M.; Amoruso, A.; Corazzari, M. Probiotics Supplements Reduce ER Stress and Gut Inflammation Associated With Gliadin Intake in Celiac Disease Mouse Model. Preprints 2020, 2020120581 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0581.v1).

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a permanent intolerance to dietary protein, gluten, from wheat rye and barley. It occurs in about 1% worldwide population, in genetically predisposed individuals bearing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2/DQ8. Gut epithelial cell stress and innate immune activation are responsible for breaking oral tolerance to gliadin, the gluten component. To date, the only treatment available for CD is a long-term gluten-free diet. Several evidences show that an altered composition of the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) could play a key role in the pathogenesis of CD, through the modulation of intestinal permeability and the regulation of the immune system. Here we show that gliadin induces a chronic ER stress condition in the small intestine of a CD mouse model and that the co-administration of probiotics efficiently attenuates both UPR and gut inflammation. Moreover, the composition of probiotics formulations might differ in their activity at molecular level, especially toward the three axes of the UPR. Therefore, rebalancing the gut microbiota composition by probiotics administration might rep-resent a new strategy to treat CD affected patients.

Subject Areas

CD; UPR; TG2; CFTR; probiotics

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