Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Microbiome and Mosquito Vectorial Capacity: Rich Potential for Discovery and Translation

Version 1 : Received: 18 December 2020 / Approved: 22 December 2020 / Online: 22 December 2020 (10:49:13 CET)

How to cite: Cansado-Utrilla, C.; Zhao, S.; McCall, P.; Coon, K.; Hughes, G. The Microbiome and Mosquito Vectorial Capacity: Rich Potential for Discovery and Translation. Preprints 2020, 2020120554 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0554.v1). Cansado-Utrilla, C.; Zhao, S.; McCall, P.; Coon, K.; Hughes, G. The Microbiome and Mosquito Vectorial Capacity: Rich Potential for Discovery and Translation. Preprints 2020, 2020120554 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0554.v1).

Abstract

Microbiome research has gained considerable interest due to the emerging evidence of its impact on human and animal health. Similar to higher organisms, the gut-associated microbiota of mosquitoes affect host fitness and other phenotypes. It is now well established that microbes can alter pathogen transmission in mosquitoes, either positively or negatively, and avenues are being explored to exploit microbes for vector control. However, less attention has been paid to how microbiota affect phenotypes that impact vectorial capacity. Several mosquito and pathogen components, such as vector density, biting rate, survival, vector competence and pathogen extrinsic incubation period all influence pathogen transmission. Interestingly, the mosquito gut-associated microbes can impact each of these components, and therefore ultimately modulate vectorial capacity. Promisingly, this expands the options available to exploit microbes for vector control by also targeting parameters that affect vectorial capacity. However, there are still many knowledge gaps in the biology of the mosquito – microbe symbiosis that need to be addressed in order to understand these interactions more thoroughly and exploit them efficiently. Here, we review current evidence of the impacts of the microbiome on aspects of vectorial capacity highlighting opportunities for novel vector control strategies and areas where further studies are required.

Subject Areas

microbiome; vectorial capacity; density; competence; biting; extrinsic incubation period; longevity; mosquito; symbiosis; pathogen transmission

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