Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Assessment of Anthropogenic Impacts on Carbon Sequestration Potential of a Moist Semi-Deciduous Forest in Eastern Ghana

Version 1 : Received: 17 December 2020 / Approved: 18 December 2020 / Online: 18 December 2020 (15:18:24 CET)

How to cite: Bentsi-Enchill, F.; Nii Moi Pappoe, A.; Ekumah, B.; Komla Akotoye, H. Assessment of Anthropogenic Impacts on Carbon Sequestration Potential of a Moist Semi-Deciduous Forest in Eastern Ghana. Preprints 2020, 2020120477 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0477.v1). Bentsi-Enchill, F.; Nii Moi Pappoe, A.; Ekumah, B.; Komla Akotoye, H. Assessment of Anthropogenic Impacts on Carbon Sequestration Potential of a Moist Semi-Deciduous Forest in Eastern Ghana. Preprints 2020, 2020120477 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0477.v1).

Abstract

Carbon sequestration is associated with plant biomass and soils. The amount of carbon sequestration in the Atewa Range Forest Reserve (ARFR) is affected by varied anthropogenic activities like logging, mining and farming. This study estimate the above and below ground carbon stock and assess human-induced stress impacts on the Highly Stressed Vegetation (HSV), Moderately Stressed Vegetation (MSV), and Non-Stressed Vegetation (NSV) in the ARFR. The above ground biomass of trees was determined using the allometric model of (Henry, et al., 2010) whereas plants root biomass was calculated using Cairns et al. (1997). Soil organic carbon was determined using the Walkley–Black method. We observed that carbon stock was higher in the above-ground than the below-ground component. The MSV, recorded the highest stock of carbon followed by the NSV and the HSV whilst sequestrated carbon stocks was generally high and varied across the three stress levels. Within the forest, the intensity of anthropogenic activities has negatively impacted the amounts of carbon sequestrated at various levels.

Subject Areas

Above ground biomass; Anthropogenic; Below ground biomass; Carbon sequestration; Forest

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