Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Personalized Biometrics of Physical Pain Agree with Its Psychological Perception by Participants with Sensory Over Responsivity

Version 1 : Received: 15 December 2020 / Approved: 16 December 2020 / Online: 16 December 2020 (13:19:42 CET)

How to cite: Ryu, J.; Bar-Shalita, T.; Granovsky, Y.; Weissman-Fogel, I.; Torres, E.B. Personalized Biometrics of Physical Pain Agree with Its Psychological Perception by Participants with Sensory Over Responsivity. Preprints 2020, 2020120409 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0409.v1). Ryu, J.; Bar-Shalita, T.; Granovsky, Y.; Weissman-Fogel, I.; Torres, E.B. Personalized Biometrics of Physical Pain Agree with Its Psychological Perception by Participants with Sensory Over Responsivity. Preprints 2020, 2020120409 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0409.v1).

Abstract

The study of pain requires a balance between subjective methods that rely on self-reports and complementary objective biometrics that ascertain physical signals associated with subjective accounts. There are at present no objective scales that enable the personalized assessment of pain, as most work involving electrophysiology rely on summary statistics from a priori theoretical population assumptions. Along these lines, recent work has provided evidence of differences in pain sensations between participants with Sensory Over Responsivity (SOR) and controls. While these analyses are useful to understand pain across groups, there remains a need to quantify individual differences more precisely in a personalized manner. Here we offer new methods to characterize pain using the moment-by-moment standardized fluctuations in EEG brain activity centrally reflecting the person’s experiencing temperature-based stimulation at the periphery. This type of gross data is often disregarded as noise, yet here we show its utility to characterize the lingering sensation of discomfort raising to the level of pain, individually, for each participant. We show fundamental differences between the SOR group in relation to controls and provide an objective account of pain congruent with the subjective self-reported data. This offers the potential to build a standardized scale useful to profile pain levels in a personalized manner across the general population.

Subject Areas

EEG; pain biometrics; stochastic analyses; micro-movements spikes; sensory over responsivity; standardized scale; personalized pain

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