Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Dissecting the Roles of Cuticular Wax in Plant Resistance to Shoot Dehydration and Low-Temperature Stress in Arabidopsis

Version 1 : Received: 2 December 2020 / Approved: 3 December 2020 / Online: 3 December 2020 (09:54:39 CET)

How to cite: Rahman, T.; Shao, M.; Pahari, S.; Venglat, P.; Soolanayakanahally, R.; Qiu, X.; Rahman, A.; Tanino, K. Dissecting the Roles of Cuticular Wax in Plant Resistance to Shoot Dehydration and Low-Temperature Stress in Arabidopsis. Preprints 2020, 2020120077 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0077.v1). Rahman, T.; Shao, M.; Pahari, S.; Venglat, P.; Soolanayakanahally, R.; Qiu, X.; Rahman, A.; Tanino, K. Dissecting the Roles of Cuticular Wax in Plant Resistance to Shoot Dehydration and Low-Temperature Stress in Arabidopsis. Preprints 2020, 2020120077 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0077.v1).

Abstract

Cuticular waxes are a mixture of hydrophobic very-long-chain fatty acids and their derivatives accumulated in the plant cuticle. Most studies define the role of cuticular wax largely based on reducing non-stomatal water loss. The present study investigated the role of cuticular wax in reducing both low-temperature and dehydration stress in plants using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants and transgenic genotypes altered in the formation of cuticular wax. cer3-6, a known Arabidopsis wax-deficient mutant (with distinct reduction in aldehydes, n-alkanes, secondary n-alcohols, and ketones compared to wild type (WT)), was most sensitive to water loss; while dewax, a known wax overproducer (greater alkanes and ketones compared to WT), was more resistant to dehydration compared to WT. Furthermore, cold-acclimated cer3-6 froze at warmer temperatures, while cold-acclimated dewax displayed freezing exotherms at colder temperatures compared to WT. GC-MS analysis identified a characteristic decrease in the accumulation of certain waxes (e.g. alkanes, alcohols) in Arabidopsis cuticles under cold acclimation, which was additionally reduced in cer3-6. Conversely, the dewax mutant showed a greater ability to accumulate waxes under cold acclimation. FTIR spectroscopy also supported observations in cuticular wax deposition under cold acclimation. Our data indicate cuticular alkane waxes along with alcohols and fatty acids can facilitate avoidance of both ice formation and leaf water loss under dehydration stress, and are promising genetic targets of interest.

Subject Areas

Cuticular wax; dehydration; low temperature; freezing, stress avoidance; alkane

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