Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Associations of Residential Brownness and Greenness with Fasting Glucose in Young Healthy Adults Living in the Desert

Version 1 : Received: 18 November 2020 / Approved: 20 November 2020 / Online: 20 November 2020 (11:25:55 CET)

How to cite: Olvera Alvarez, H.A.; Browning, M.H.E.M.; Neophytou, A.M.; Bratman, G.N. Associations of Residential Brownness and Greenness with Fasting Glucose in Young Healthy Adults Living in the Desert. Preprints 2020, 2020110538 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0538.v1). Olvera Alvarez, H.A.; Browning, M.H.E.M.; Neophytou, A.M.; Bratman, G.N. Associations of Residential Brownness and Greenness with Fasting Glucose in Young Healthy Adults Living in the Desert. Preprints 2020, 2020110538 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0538.v1).

Abstract

Evolutionary psychology theories propose that contact with green, natural environments may benefit physical health, but little comparable evidence exists for brown, natural environments, such as the desert. In this study, we examined the association between “brownness” and “greenness” with fasting glucose among young residents of El Paso, Texas. We defined brownness as the surface not covered by vegetation or impervious land within Euclidian buffers around participants’ homes. Fasting glucose along with demographic and behavioral data was obtained from the Nurse Engagement and Wellness Study (N = 517). We found that residential proximity to brownness was not associated with fasting glucose when modeled independently. In contrast, we found that residential greenness was associated with decreased levels of fasting glucose, despite the relatively low levels of greenness within the predominantly desert environment of El Paso. A difference between the top and bottom greenness exposure quartiles within a 250 m buffer was associated with a 3.5 mg/dL decrease in fasting glucose levels (95% confidence interval: -6.2, -0.8). Our results suggest that within the understudied context of the desert, green vegetation may be health-promoting to a degree that is similar to other, non-desert locations in the world that have higher baselines levels of green.

Subject Areas

Green space; Arid; Diabetes; Hispanics; Built Environment; Biophilia

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