Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Multifaceted Roles of Copper in Cancer: a Trace Metal Element with Dysregulated Metabolism, but also a Target or a Bullet for Therapy

Version 1 : Received: 15 October 2020 / Approved: 16 October 2020 / Online: 16 October 2020 (14:32:16 CEST)

How to cite: Lelièvre, P.; Sancey, L.; Coll, J.; Deniaud, A.; Busser, B. The Multifaceted Roles of Copper in Cancer: a Trace Metal Element with Dysregulated Metabolism, but also a Target or a Bullet for Therapy. Preprints 2020, 2020100353 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0353.v1). Lelièvre, P.; Sancey, L.; Coll, J.; Deniaud, A.; Busser, B. The Multifaceted Roles of Copper in Cancer: a Trace Metal Element with Dysregulated Metabolism, but also a Target or a Bullet for Therapy. Preprints 2020, 2020100353 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0353.v1).

Abstract

In the human body, Copper (Cu) is a major and essential player in a large number of cellular mechanisms and signaling pathways. The involvement of Cu in oxidation-reduction reactions requires close regulation of copper metabolism in order to avoid toxic effects. In many types of cancer, variations in copper protein levels have been demonstrated. These variations result in increased concentrations of intra-tumoral Cu and alterations in the systemic distribution of copper. Such alterations in Cu homeostasis may promote tumor growth or invasiveness, or even confer resistance to treatments. Once characterized, the dysregulated Cu metabolism is pinpointing several promising biomarkers for clinical use, with prognostic or predictive capabilities. The altered Cu metabolism in cancer cells and the different responses of tumor cells to Cu are strongly supporting the development of treatments to disrupt, deplete or increase Cu levels in tumors. The metallic nature of Cu, as a chemical element, is key for the development of anticancer agents via the synthesis of nanoparticles or copper-based complexes with antineoplastic properties for therapy. Finally, some of these new therapeutic strategies such as chelators or ionophores have shown promising results in a preclinical setting, while others are already in the clinic.

Subject Areas

Copper homeostasis; Cancer; Prognostic; Diagnostic; Therapy

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